Questions or technical issues? Please email info@chicagochambermusic.org


CCM WebSite

EncoreCCM

Name of Work

Stravinsky, Igor (1882-1971)
Pastorale (1907)

Movements:
Pastorale

Performances:


Oct 04, 2009



Jasmine Lin, Violin
Michael Henoch, Oboe
Larry Combs, Clarinet
Dennis Michel, Bassoon
Scott Hostetler, English horn
Jasmine Lin, Violin


Oct 05, 2009



Jasmine Lin, Violin
Michael Henoch, Oboe
Larry Combs, Clarinet
Dennis Michel, Bassoon
Scott Hostetler, English horn

STRAVINSKY - Pastorale for Violin and Piano

Composed in 1907

When Stravinsky first met Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov in 1902 in Heidelberg and played that doyen of Russian music some of his piano pieces, he was urged to continue his law studies, but also advised that formal theoretical training would be of some help if he were really determined to become a composer. Back in St. Petersburg, Stravinsky remained at the university law school, but spent increasingly more time studying music. Two years later, having become a close friend of the Rimsky-Korsakov family, he took a just-completed piano sonata to Nikolai. Though Rimsky criticized it harshly page by page, he found for the first time qualities worth encouraging in Stravinsky’s music, and accepted him as a student. Under Rimsky’s tutelage, Stravinsky abandoned the law and took up composition in earnest, completing in 1907 the orchestral song cycle Faun and Shepherdess, the Symphony in E-flat (Op. 1 — Stravinsky gave up using opus numbers after these few youthful works) and the Pastorale.

The Pastorale, a song without words for soprano and piano, was written in October 1907 and dedicated to Rimsky-Korsakov’s daughter, Nadezhda, who sang it at that year’s family Christmas gathering. The public premiere was given by soprano Yelizaveta Petrenko with the composer at the piano at the St. Petersburg Evening of Contemporary Music on December 27th. The Pastorale, tranquil and vaguely Oriental, may owe its inspiration to several wordless vocal passages of nature painting in Rimsky-Korsakov’s fantasy operas. Stravinsky remained fond of this early miniature, and he arranged it for soprano, oboe, English horn, clarinet and bassoon in December 1923, just two months after the premiere of his Octet for Winds in Paris. In 1933, he reworked and lengthened the piece as a recital item for violin and piano with the collaboration for Samuel Dushkin, for whom he had recently written the Violin Concerto and Duo Concertante.

Program Notes by Dr. Richard E. Rodda

Performed October 4 & 5, 2009



Performance Audio